CLARA BARTON MEMORIAL RIBBON. WOMAN'S RELIEF CORPS.
CLARA BARTON MEMORIAL RIBBON
CLARA BARTON MEMORIAL RIBBON
CLARA BARTON MEMORIAL RIBBON

CLARA BARTON MEMORIAL RIBBON

1912. Satin ribbon (8 7/16 in, 21 2/5 cm). Created the year of Clara Barton's passing. Decoratively printed: "Thirtieth / National Convention / of the / Woman's / Relief Corps / Auxiliary to the / Grand Army of the Republic" / Vignette portrait of Clara Barton captioned "Very sincerely yours, / Clara Barton" in facsimile script. / "The world will not forget / that she served / God and her country" / "Los Angeles, Cal. / 1912" / "Massachusetts."

In Massachusetts, Clara Barton (1821-1912) excelled as a teacher, improved schools, and enabled education for workers' children. Asked to establish schools, she demanded wages equal to that of men, and created a system of free education in New Jersey. Barton became one of few women in government and demanded equal wages. On the battlefield of the Civil War, she organized medical supplies, nearly lost her life to nurse wounded soldiers, and became a supervisor of nurses. After the war, Barton opened an office to search for missing men and to mark graves. She became an orator on her work during the Civil War. Barton worked for the International Red Cross in Europe, returning to successfully campaign for America's participation in the Geneva Convention. Founder of the American Red Cross, she was president for twenty-two years and extended relief to peacetime disasters in America and abroad. Barton was a leading suffragist and featured speaker at the First International Woman's Suffrage Conference. She also participated in the anti-slavery movement. Highly recognized abroad, Barton became the most decorated woman in America.

ANB. Blain et al, Feminist Companion. Adelman, Famous Women. Few barely-detectable wrinkles with slight bend near top edge. Protected by two clear, closely fitted sleeves with white board backing. Presents very well. Very good+. Item #1123

Price: $95.00

See all items in Ephemera, Social Thought, Women
See all items by